bg
close
close
CHOOSE YOUR ADVENTURE
Select Industry
CHOOSE CAPABILITIES

Media Plan Components

Media planners and buyers are known for the immense amount of research they do before planning and placing a media buy for a client. There are meetings with the account executive and the media reps, email exchanges, phone calls, Google searches, Arbitron data, Scarborough research, good ole’ fashioned hardcopy DMA maps and more. In fact, for most advertising agency account executives and coordinators, the media plan comes nicely packaged and ready for presentation. Sure, there are some questions to answer and sometimes some changes to be made, but the bulk of the work and research is complete.

So, today we wanted to take you behind the scenes to see how the media research translates to each component of a media plan. Below and are some terms and definitions that you can expect to see on your media plan, but first – what is a media plan? A media plan includes the recommendations and a detailed rationale for all media activities and spending for a given client. Information that should be included in a media plan is the objective, strategy, rationale, execution and summary.

MEDIA OBJECTIVE – This is a statement of a goal or goals and should be able to be measured and correspond to the overall strategic objectives of the marketing objectives provided by the account executive, but should not restate them. The objective does not include recommendations for specific mediums. Mediums should not be selected before the objectives and targets have been detailed.

MEDIA STRATEGY – Media strategy includes information such as budget, target audience, seasonality, region, city or market size and other considerations. This strategy will also include demographic information such as age, race and household income.

MEDIA RATIONALE – The media rationale is an explanation of why each medium makes sense for the client based on the stated media objectives. The rationale supports the media objective with marketing facts and states why the mediums are recommended, including characteristics of each and how it will be implemented into the strategy. The media rationale should also state why the media planner chose the specific time periods, sizes, commercial lengths for the client.

FLOWCHART – A media plan should always include a flowchart. This is a document that shows the execution of the plan, at a glance, and includes all of the mediums and timing that placements should run on these mediums.

SUMMARY – This is a simple summary of each of the mediums including period, budget, audience/circulation, length or size, reach or coverage, reach and frequency and total ratings points. Also included should be a chart with the budget by medium.

Related Articles

Posted on July 27th, 2018

Creative, Financial Services, Media

Fusing Media and Creative to Identify Credit Union Marketing Opportunities

Crossing Department Lines to Differentiate a Credit Union’s Marketing We’ve all heard the saying — two minds are better than one. In advertising, that rings especially true. Collaboration is the key to […]

Continue Reading

Posted on August 1st, 2017

Ad Industry, Media, Strategy

How Important is Showing an Economic Impact for Your Marketing Efforts?

You may have never thought about showing the economic impact for your marketing and advertising efforts, but you’d be surprised to see how far the numbers can span. Destination marketing organizations (DMOs), […]

Continue Reading

Posted on December 13th, 2016

Ad Industry, Marketing, Media, Social Media

Social Media Advertising Trend Predictions for 2017

The social media landscape has come a long way since the days of 140-character limits and AOL buddy lists. Naturally, certain fundamentals have stuck around (i.e. image sharing, link inclusions, Facebook-like social […]

Continue Reading

Posted on May 29th, 2014

Ad Industry, Marketing, Media, Strategy

Internet Ad Sales Outpace Broadcast TV Revenue

When PricewaterhouseCoopers recently released an Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) sponsored study stating that 2013 Internet advertising revenues surpassed that of broadcast TV by 7 percent, it felt in many ways like a seminal changing of the guard. The usurper, having long since shed its “new” media moniker, had really gone and done it this time.

Continue Reading

Posted on September 17th, 2012

Ad Industry, Media

Media Buying During an Election Year

It is of critical importance for media planners to make their account managers and clients aware that elections, especially federal elections, can significantly impact their media buying schedule. In 2012, the presidential […]

Continue Reading